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Position Opening: Development Director, Isabella Santos Foundation

Position:           Development Director 

Organization:    Isabella Santos Foundation (ISF)

Location:           Remote in Charlotte metro area

Reports To:       President

 

Organization Overview 

Mission & Vision
The Isabella Santos Foundation (ISF) is a 501(c)3 childhood cancer foundation dedicated to raising funds for research for neuroblastoma, other rare pediatric cancers, and charities that directly impact the lives of children with cancer. ISF was founded in honor of Isabella Santos from Charlotte, NC who lost her battle against neuroblastoma. ISF works to improve rare pediatric treatment options in an effort to improve the survival rate of kids with cancer.

History
In 2009, ISF was established through Isabella’s parents to raise awareness and research funds for neuroblastoma and received its tax-deductible 503(c)3 status in 2010. What began as an effort of a circle of friends has emerged into one of Charlotte’s fastest-growing nonprofit organizations. The goal of the foundation is to raise money and awareness for rare solid tumor cancer research in an effort to increase survival rates of kids with cancer so they can live their dreams. Through Isabella’s legacy, ISF works to help impact other kids fighting cancer in her name. To date, ISF has donated over $3.5 million to support its mission.

For more information about Isabella Santos Foundation, please visit isabellasantosfoundation.org.

Opportunity

Through the Isabella Santos Foundation, people across the country are raising money for solid-tumor cancer research and treatments. The foundation currently focuses on events, direct donations, sponsorships and peer-to-peer as the core fundraising strategies.

The Isabella Santos Foundation recently launched the Rare & Solid Tumor Program at Levine Children’s Hospital, ensuring children and families will have access to the latest cancer expertise in Charlotte and the surrounding region. The Isabella Santos Foundation made a commitment in 2018 to raise $5 million to create the Rare & Solid Tumor Program at Levine Children’s Hospital.

To achieve these goals, ISF is seeking a Development Director to source new donors and manage the organization’s fundraising strategy. The full-time Development Director is responsible for leading resource development activities toward generating $300,000 – $400,000 annually.

The Role

Reporting to the President, the Development Director will be responsible for implementing and managing a development program through a variety of revenue streams with a focus on the cultivation and expansion of new donors and stewardship of existing relationships.

The Development Director will be responsible for crafting a development plan and budget that supports the strategic plan of the staff and board leadership on an annual basis. The Director will be responsible for the design and execution of a comprehensive written annual fundraising plan and goal revenue projection to include individual donors and peer-to-peer strategies. Key responsibilities include:

Development Planning

  • In partnership with the President, craft annual development plan outlining the full-year of giving strategies to sustain and increase support from corporations, events, foundations and individuals
  • Create multi-year strategies for implementing a moves management model of resource development, prospecting, recruiting, engaging, soliciting and stewarding donors and sponsors

Culture Development

  • Establish a first-class stewardship program that effectively engages all constituents (staff, board, volunteers, donors) in supporting the ISF mission and in creating a culture of philanthropy
  • Activity participate in professional fundraising associations and industry groups to stay current of all new practices and innovations in the development field, employing appropriate best practices at ISF
  • Follow current fundraising trends in philanthropy and the nonprofit community

Individual Fundraising

  • Prioritize focus on acquisition strategies to uncover new sources of individual donors, building relationships to onboard them as constituents to the organization
  • Develop new peer-to-peer giving strategies to grow the base of funders and onboard constituents to the organization’s compelling mission
  • Oversee the organization’s efforts to deepen relationships, facilitating activities that increase affinity and engagement, increasing involvement and financial support
  • Maintain ongoing communication with major gift donors, stewarding their engagement with organizational leaders

Development Operations

  • Maintain timely records of all donor, sponsor and prospect contacts in donor database
  • In collaboration with the marketing team, develop content for a variety of channels related to fundraising
  • Assure accurate and timely member, donor, sponsor recognition, acknowledgements, and renewal letters for all financial and in-kind donations
  • Research effective ways to integrate social media strategies into giving campaigns

Required Qualifications & Competencies

The ideal candidate would have the following capabilities and qualities:

  • Minimum of 5 years’ experience in resource development or related field (i.e. marketing, external relations, business development/sales, community relations)
  • Demonstrated expertise in the areas of fundraising, especially cultivating and stewarding donors, peer-to-peer giving strategies and corporate sponsorship
  • A commitment to the ISF mission and ability to speak publicly about the mission with passion
  • Strong ability to make connections easily and create authentic relationships with a wide variety of individuals and groups
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • A self-starter, capable of working in a decentralized work environment
  • Solid analytical skills and basic understanding of financial levers
  • Proficiency with Google Suite, Microsoft Office and CRM software
  • Bachelor’s Degree required, with a preference for candidates with continuing education in advancement, fundraising and philanthropy; CFRE designation is a plus
  • Ability to work extended hours, including nights and weekends, as needed

Compensation
Base compensation will be in the $65,000 – $70,000 range with opportunities for performance-based bonuses.

To Apply

Isabella Santos Foundation has partnered with Next Stage to help in this hire. Beginning September 16, 2019, all inquiries, nominations and applications should be directed via email to Next Stage (search@nextstage-consulting.com). Applications must include a compelling cover letter and CV to be considered for the role. Please also indicate where you learned of the opportunity.

Please note that only those candidates invited for screening will be contacted. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Isabella Santos Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to inclusive hiring and dedicated to diversity in its works and staff. Employment decisions are made without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sex, national origin, physical or mental disability, age, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable state of federal law. ISF encourages candidates of all groups and communities to apply for this position.

About Next Stage

Next Stage is a strategy and implementation firm based in Charlotte, NC and serving nonprofit organizations and social cause start-ups throughout the Carolinas.  Next Stage works with nonprofit organizations to develop game-changing strategies and strengthened operations in service to mission and long-range vision. We partner with clients through three key service lines: strategic planning, resource development planning, and talent development. For more information about Next Stage, please visit nextstage-consulting.com.

The Community Social Impact Portfolio

by Josh Jacobson

This post launches a weekly series through mid-September outlining a new way to think about stewarding nonprofits in the Charlotte region – the Community Social Impact Portfolio.


A couple years ago, I decided to try my hand at investing. My wife and I had been utilizing a financial advisor who was primarily passively managing a system of 401ks and IRAs. I thought, why pay someone to do what I could do for myself?

I’m glad I did it, but it required me to become far more knowledgeable about concepts with which I was only partially familiar. The majority of our holdings were in mutual funds, and with a little bit of research, I was able to better understand how best to create a balanced, diversified portfolio that was responsive to the market. And on a semi-annual basis, I do a bit more research to rebalance the portfolio. We’re long-term investors so I tend not to pay it daily or weekly attention. But I rest easy at night knowing that my investments are optimized.

That notion of a diversified portfolio got me thinking – could the same principles be applied to optimize the nonprofit sector?  How can donors have a similarly good feeling knowing that their social investments are producing positive returns for the community in which they live?

This concept has been a moment of inspiration for our consulting firm, which has taken a hard look at what makes a healthy social impact ecosystem, and as importantly, what we all can do to make it a reality.

The following blog post kicks off a six-part weekly series that will outline a way of thinking about the many nonprofits that serve our community and a call-to-action for all of us to get more strategic in how we foster what I like to call a “Community Social Impact Portfolio.”

Understanding the 501c3

To get started, we first have to all be on the same page with what it means to be a nonprofit organization. Believe it or not, board members for a large percentage of Next Stage’s client base have pretty profound misconceptions about the nonprofit they are charged with governing. The ah-ha moment typically comes when I share the following at the beginning of a board retreat:

This nonprofit is owned by me, it is owned by you, it is owned by everyone. A 501c3 charitable organization is a public entity that is charged with doing that which is in the best interest of the community it serves. Just like government. And you are its board members who have elected to take on its governance responsibility, ensuring that the organization serves the best interests of the broader public. And you don’t even get paid for it. What you have chosen to do on my behalf, on everyone’s behalf, is pretty exceptional. Thank you. Thank you for all you do and for being here this morning.

You can imagine the faces of these unsuspecting board members at this point, who are suddenly very present in the Saturday morning retreat they signed up for but did not fully understand. Excuse me, what?

It is generally not very well understood (particularly by nonprofit founders) that once an organization receives its 501c3 status, it has thus been given over to all people to “own.” In exchange, the US Internal Revenue Code allows for federal tax exemption for gifts to support its mission. It is a pretty decent trade off, but only if one truly understands what it means to give up control to the public.

Too Many Cooks

If we accept that nonprofits are owned by all of us as taxpayers, and are effectively doing the work government would do on our behalf if it had the interest in doing so, then surely we must have some form of control over how nonprofits are formed, right? I mean, if I encounter long lines at the DMV, it isn’t like I can just go down the road and set up my own DMV. There must be some form of checks and balances?

The answer is: nope. Technically, the IRS is the gatekeeper, but it isn’t a very discriminating arbiter. According the 2016 IRS Data Book, more than 86,000 new tax-exempt organizations came online in 2016 with just over 1,000 denied tax exempt-status. That means that more than 98% of organizations that apply for tax-exempt status receive it. And you and I don’t have very much control over that.

So what does that look like in practice?  Charlotte is a great example of the explosion of nonprofit sector over the last twenty years. There are nearly 5,000 registered charities in Mecklenburg County alone (including roughly 3,600 public charities). While Mecklenburg County’s population has nearly doubled in the past 20 years, the number of public charities has increased three-fold.

Needless to say, this is an unsustainable trend. It creates duplication of services and unneeded competition for donor dollars. It creates backlash for founders of new nonprofits with truly game-changing strategies. And it reinforces a nonprofit culture that avoids taking risks for fear of losing ground.

It simply isn’t all that strategic.

Strategy is My… Middle Name

As a consultant to nonprofits in the Charlotte area for almost a decade, I’ve had the opportunity to work with more than 160 organizations of all shapes and sizes. My firm focuses on leveraging internal assets to meet external need. It requires being a student of our community.

This work has informed a philosophy that a healthy city must feature a variety of nonprofit organizations working in concert to address community needs. And just as a healthy stock portfolio should be diversified, a region’s nonprofit sector should include a carefully curated portfolio of community resources.

In fact, I’d suggest that all nonprofit organizations in the Charlotte region should fall into one of five categories:

  • Emerging Startups – Not every new nonprofit contributes to the bloat described above. The nonprofit sector is ripe for disruption, and social entrepreneurs with new and different ways to achieve success are needed now more than ever.  Sometimes these individuals should be encouraged to align with already-developed nonprofits, but other times there are good reasons to launch a new 501c3 endeavor. Just as your investment portfolio should have some early-growth companies, a community should come together to champion dynamic new efforts.
  • Niche Organizations – The vast majority of nonprofits should be in pursuit of niche status – that is, “owning their space.”  This requires identifying an organization’s core value proposition and striving to lead in that space. That may mean getting narrower in focus to differentiate, or expanding operations to meet community need. A niche organization must have a plan for maintaining its role as a leader and adapting to a changing community. After all, companies only stay in your investment strategy if they demonstrate a capacity for adaptability.
  • Imported Nonprofits – Organizations that demonstrate fidelity and have built an evidence-base should be encouraged to scale.  Communities must be willing to embrace organizations with demonstrated impact that can scale to provide programming that is locally informed and delivered. Charlotte needn’t re-create the wheel if a program has proven successful in another comparable city. For our investment analogy, consider these organizations like investing in foreign markets. When our own community lacks bandwidth or successful strategies, other communities may hold the answer.
  • Blue-Chip Institutions – In Charlotte, the vast majority of financial resources are generated by the top 100 nonprofit organizations with budgets topping $4 million. These organizations should be encouraged to collaborate with organizations in the preceding three categories, leveraging their revenue and assets in service to increased community impact. Since these organizations control the majority of resources, they should also be expected to drive innovation through an R&D function.
  • Foundations – It can be easy to forget, but private foundations are nonprofits as well and they play an incredibly important role in providing resources to fuel social impact. Working with individual donors, foundations should strive to curate a community portfolio of nonprofit resources to ensure a healthy and vibrant community. This means working together and understanding community challenges at the ground level.

Going forward, Next Stage is orienting all of its work toward these five classifications of nonprofits, and is committing to work on behalf of the greater good to help organizations be the best representation of where they are in these categories. The firm is reorganizing its service lines to align with this philosophy, and will be stumping on this topic to actualize a community that is knowledgeable and bought-in to the road ahead.

In the weeks to come, this series will explore each of these five categories, making suggestions for how nonprofits, donors and volunteers can optimize their organizations to create a dynamic Community Social Impact Portfolio.  I will be joined in this effort by Next Stage’s Caylin Viales, who will collaborate on the series and is a big part of helping to create our firm’s response to this new way of seeing our charge.

As always, we hope you will digest this content (we know its wordy – these are big ideas!) and engage us on it.

Because these nonprofits belong to all of us. And it’s about time we acted like it.

Just starting this series? Read the other installments here:

Overview: The Community Social Impact Portfolio
Emerging Organizations
Niche Organizations
Imported Organizations
Blue Chip Organizations


JoshJosh Jacobson is Managing Director of Next Stage Consulting, a Charlotte-based firm focused on organizational development and fund development for the nonprofit sector. Next Stage Consulting provides organizations access to affordable, high-quality consulting services to help them “get to the next level.” Josh is a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE) and is President Elect for the Charlotte Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

Crowdfunding Backlash: Reading Rainbow

So, did you hear LeVar Burton raised a whole bunch of money on Kickstarter last week to relaunch Reading Rainbow?

The original goal was to raise $1 million in just over a month, with donations used to expand the Reading Rainbow app Burton has already developed (he bought the rights in 2009) into a web-based destination. In less than a day, the project reached its initial goal amount. The campaign has raised more than $3.2 million and climbing.

If you’re famous and can leverage nostalgia, crowdfunding can be very lucrative, but not without some criticism. The Veronica Mars Kickstarter Campaign raised $5.7 million for a movie based on the television show, and Zach Braff built upon affinity for his first film with a $3.1 million campaign to finance his new film. Both efforts were roundly denounced in the media, with Kickstarter’s founders forced to go on record with their reasoning.

Which brings us to Reading Rainbow. Despite a tremendous outpouring of support from donors and largely positive media notices, there was this from The Washington Post’s Caitlin Dewey:

Crowdfunding is theoretically supposed to bolster charities, start-ups, independent artists, small-business owners  and other projects that actually need the financial support of the masses to succeed. It’s not supposed to be co-opted by companies with profit motives and private investors of their own…”

As someone who has dedicated his life to helping nonprofits, a part of me understands this criticism. But I’ve come to accept that the world is changing, that technology has created a way to connect people with projects they want to see happen, and they aren’t digging up 990s on Guidestar to make their decisions. More than 72,000 people have supported the Reading Rainbow project, and despite sour grapes from the traditional press, folks are wearing their support like a badge of honor on social media.

Rather than see this as a challenge to the charitable sector, I suggest nonprofits study it and look to replicate it themselves. So what are the ingredients to a really good Kickstarter campaign?

  • Name Recognition: Millions have been generated for Reading Rainbow because many remember it as children.  If your nonprofit doesn’t evoke similar nostalgia or recognition, try securing a spokesperson who does. Bringing a recognizable face to your crowdfunding project helps it get early traction and shares on social media.
  • Marketing: A common mistake is to launch a crowdfunding campaign too early, assuming the site itself will market your campaign. In reality, a crowdfunding campaign is just like any other fundraising campaign – it needs a solid marketing plan to support it. Social and traditional media coupled with person-to-person outreach lights the spark of awareness that helps get the campaign off the ground, and can give it a boost if it lags.
  • Personal Requests: The dream of every fundraiser is that their message will hit a tipping point, and the dollars will start pouring in from people who are completely new to the organization. But the reality is that a base of support is needed first, and that is most likely to come from friends of friends. Your organization’s stakeholders have to be willing to leverage their networks to get that first 10-25% of support. 
  • Rewards: Those who support a crowdfunded campaign are typically different than your annual fund donors. They are more likely to skew younger, are impulsive in their investment, and are definitely wooed by perks. LeVar Burton offered donors of $10,000 or more the opportunity to wear his famous Star Trek visor (so far no takers), but that benefit has been reported by nearly every reporter who has covered the story. What can your organization offer that might get you some ink?

In the future, we are likely to support artists, writers, directors, musicians and yes, corporations by voting with our credit cards at the R&D stage, mitigating the risk of new ventures. For now, the morality police are keeping the space clear for the little guys – don’t let this opportunity pass you by!

What Can Bill Gates Teach Us in the Carolinas About Philanthropy?

By Josh Jacobson

The Next Stage Consulting blog is committed to covering topics related to life in the Carolinas.  So, what can a billionaire like Bill Gates teach us about what is happening in our own backyards?

First, a refresher on Bill Gates – most likely know him as the founder of Microsoft, the maker of Windows and the Office suite of software products that dominate the business landscape. But if you haven’t been paying attention, you may not know that he and his wife Melinda are the world’s leading philanthropists, having pledged to give away the vast majority of their estimated $78+ billion fortune to charity.

It is an amazing commitment, and one that has inspired more than 100 billionaires to make a similar commitment of donating more than half of their fortunes.  The Giving Pledge now counts high-profile billionaires like financier Warren Buffett, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and recently Virgin Group-founder Richard Branson.

Since 2000, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has done some extraordinary things, including the near-eradication of polio from poverty-stricken countries across the world.  In fact, much of the foundation’s work has been on the global stage, so it shouldn’t be surprising that the Gates Foundation’s recent annual report focuses on debunking three myths that block progress for the poor throughout the world.

Reading through the 2014 Gates Letter, written by Bill Gates himself, I couldn’t help but draw connections to life in the Carolinas:

MYTH #1: POOR COUNTRIES ARE DOOMED TO STAY POOR
This is a pervasive sentiment for many, that these countries are beyond saving and are systemically damaged.  The letter does a good job of demonstrating that this isn’t true.  Over the last couple generations, global poverty has changed measurably, with the disparity between rich and poor greatly narrowed.  In fact, “there is a class of nations in the middle that barely existed 50 years ago, and it includes more than half of the world’s population.”  Mr. Gates is so confident as to declare that by 2035, “there will be almost no poor countries left in the world.”

The larger point is a good one – real change takes time. It takes a commitment that benchmarks not on a 90-day, annual or even multi-year continuum, but on a decades-long one.  It also requires a right-sized measuring stick.  Goals should be set that are meaningful to the communities served, not as compared to western world assumptions about what should be possible based on personal experiences.

There is much wisdom here that can be applied to the challenges facing our own Carolina communities.  Quick fixes are not likely work. Philanthropists and giving entities are too often interested in narrowly-defined annual returns on investment, wanting to be able prove statistically that their giving has made a difference.  That in turn forces nonprofit organizations to develop evaluation criteria to ensure continued support.

As much as I feel passionately that this is wrongheaded, it is hard to beat up on what few sources of charitable support do exist.  For too many, there is likely an assumption that poverty in our own cities and towns is a given, a fact to accept rather than fight.  For leaders across the Carolinas, it may be useful to debunk this myth for their own communities – how important have public, private and nonprofit interventions been to improving life in the Carolinas?

MYTH #2: FOREIGN AID IS A BIG WASTE
The second myth debunked by Mr. Gates is tied directly to the first – if you think that change is impossible or unlikely, you are also apt to believe spending money on it is a waste of resources that could be put to a better purpose.  The existence of corruption in those countries makes it easy to dismiss efforts – “I mean, how much of foreign aid is really getting to the people it is meant to serve anyways?”

As a fundraiser for much of my professional life, I have encountered this argument time and again – “But what will my small contribution mean in the grand scheme of things?” The problem is that we tend to see things compartmentalized rather than as a big picture.

This is particular true as it relates to compensation of nonprofit employees, which garners more headlines than it deserves.  By focusing on perceived wasteful spending, it becomes easier to throw one’s hands in the air and declare it all a “big waste.” The tendency to view nonprofits and NGOs in the same negative light as “bloated government” has been a slowly developing trend that threatens to undermine the entire sector.

As Next Stage Consulting tells its clients, the key to sustainability is to demonstrate ROI.  But if we’re only measuring in annual increments, as noted in the previous section, are nonprofits actually their own worst enemies?  More should be done by nonprofits to educate stakeholders on the true cost of progress, particularly those who have the capacity to make the biggest impact.

MYTH #3: SAVING LIVES LEADS TO OVERPOPULATION
Admittedly, this myth is less directly applied to life in the Carolinas.  Most folks reading this are unlikely to fear that large scale interventions in poverty-stricken areas of the Carolinas will lead to a scarcity of resources.

But Mr. Gates makes a great case for the damage misinformation can do. This myth only exists because of scientific theories that were misheard, misinterpreted and accepted as fact. Saving lives has not led to overpopulation – in fact, the reverse has been true.  Education leads to more sustainable infrastructures and social progress.

Searching for connection to the Carolinas, the key may be the important role education plays in fighting social causes.  And not just the education of those directly impacted by poverty, but those community leaders called upon by society to do something about it.

CALL TO ACTION
So what can Bill Gates teach us in the Carolinas? Certainly more than one might think, but nothing more so than the commitment to improving the world through making a charitable commitment.  The message of the Gates Foundation is simple – we can all do more to make the world a better place.  And while his foundation’s focus may be on the global stage, consider making yours in neighborhoods across the Carolinas, where progress is indeed measurable and donations most definitely meaningful.

Photo Credit: Featured Image (Modified – Sebastian Derungs, World Economic Forum)