Job Announcement: Supportive Housing Communities, Chief Executive Officer

SUPPORTIVE HOUSING COMMUNITIES (SHC)

Chief Executive Officer – Position Description

 

Title:                 Chief Executive Officer

Location:          Administrative Offices at the Children and Family Services Center, 601 E. Fifth Street, Suite 255, Charlotte, NC 28202

Reports To:       Board of Directors

 

Organizational Overview

Mission

The mission of Supportive Housing Communities is to provide affordable housing to alleviate homelessness and human suffering.

Vision

SHC’s vision is to develop and operate permanent supportive housing for men, women and families overcoming homelessness, especially veterans and those with mental illness, substance abuse, and medical or other disabling conditions.

Community and Residents

SHC is a leader in Charlotte for ending homelessness. While pioneering the concept of providing permanent supportive housing to homeless people with disabilities, the agency maintains a 97% success rate of keeping residents in stable housing.

SHC goals include assisting residents in obtaining/remaining in permanent housing, encouraging residents to increase skills and/or find employment, fostering self-sufficiency and improving self-image, and supporting recovery and wellness. SHC serves formerly homeless people with at least one disability. SHC residents must earn (through employment or earned benefits) less than 30% of area median income and contribute 30% of their income, if any, toward rent. All residents are homeless at the time of entry, with 82% being chronically homeless last fiscal year. SHC provides supportive housing to more than 300 residents on a budget of over $4 million.

Programs

  • McCreesh Place is the home to 90 formerly homeless men and women. Opening its doors in 2003, McCreesh Place was Charlotte’s first permanent supportive housing complex. McCreesh Place is a recovery-based housing model and the community includes programs to support recovery. At McCreesh Place, the community makes all the difference and proves that recovery within community works.
  • Scattered Site Housing provides residents safe homes in the community and SHC advocates on behalf of the residents and promotes positive relationships with landlords.
  • John’s Place is a 32-unit apartment building purchased in July 2017 to create more affordable apartments for chronically homeless individuals and families living with disabilities.
  • Project for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program focuses on providing street outreach to adults living in outside locations such as streets, camps, wooded areas, etc.

For more information about SHC visit supportivehousingcommunities.org.

The Opportunity

At a time when all eyes are on affordable housing in the Greater Charlotte region, SHC has taken significant strides forward to increase access for people in need. The organization has onboarded several new assets and programs in recent years, increasing its scale and impact. Following the transformational, decade-long tenure of a retiring leader, the new Chief Executive Officer is taking the reins of a growing agency with a compassionate team driven to meet the need for permanent supportive housing in the Queen City.

The Role

The CEO will be a visionary leader with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, relationship-building, and advocacy skills. Reporting to the Board of Directors, the CEO is responsible for overall leadership and operations of Supportive Housing Communities including personnel, finances, program growth and development, communication, fundraising and management of overall operations. SHC has experienced significant growth in recent years and the new CEO will continue growth and sustainability in conjunction with staff, Board and key stakeholders. Key responsibilities include:

Strategic Management and Leadership

  • Serves as a strategic, visionary leader with the ability to transparently communicate goals and vision to staff, Board and key stakeholders.
  • Oversees all operations of the agency, working in partnership with the Board of Directors and the appropriate committees.
  • Establishes a clear vision for continued growth and expansion for SHC.
  • Works closely with development, design, and oversight of program growth and expansion approved by the Board.
  • Provide direct supervision of Accounting Manager, Director of Development, Chief Operating Officer, Accounting Manager and outside accounting firm. Oversees all SHC personnel.

Board Relations

  • Communicates regularly with the Board and engages the Board in meaningful participation to further SHC goals.
  • Maintains an effective and collaborative relationship with the board and implements policies, programs and goals as established by the Board.
  • Works with members of the Board to help identify and onboard new members to further advance the SHC mission.

Community Building and Public Relations

  • Serves as the lead spokesperson and relationship-builder in the community. Initiates and strengthens relationships and collaborations with organizations and leaders connected to SHC mission and goals.
  • Develops collaborative relationships with other service agencies, including the government and faith communities and other entities.
  • Expands public and community awareness; representing the agency to the community, including the media.
  • Participates in community strategic planning to maximize community resources while maintaining vision and mission of the organization.
  • Oversees production of annual report and periodic newsletters.

Fundraising and Resource Development

  • Maintains relationships with major donors of the organization.
  • Explores ways for Supportive Housing Communities to gain support and resources.
  • Manages grants and reporting requirements; providing necessary documentation.
  • Cultivates trusting positive relationships with philanthropic foundations, corporations, individual donors, faith-based organizations, and city, county, federal, and state government to support growth of the organization.

Financial Management

  • Ensures that financial records are organized and maintained in partnership with the Board of Directors.
  • Identifies outside financial management resources.
  • Approves requisitions and ensures ethical accounting standards are followed by implementing
  • effective checks and balances.
  • Works with the Finance Committee and Board of Directors in maintaining monthly and annual financial/status reports on activities of the agency.
  • Manages the yearly budget process involving SHC staff.
  • Ensures fiscal stability. Develops and oversees annual budget after approval by Board of Directors.

Human Resources Oversight

  • Holds regular staff meetings. Provides coaching and encouragement to staff, fostering a cohesive, positive team culture working effectively to support SHC mission and goals.
  • Approves job descriptions and job duties.
  • Is ultimately responsible for the hiring of employees but may incorporate the help of supervising staff and/or board members.
  • Develops and implements annual salary administration plan within parameters defined by the Board of Directors.
  • Identifies and implements insurance coverage and other employee benefits.
  • Oversees annual performance reviews and maintains written records in personnel file as required by law.

Internal Policy

  • Oversees the development, updates, and distribution of internal policy and procedures.
  • Oversees daily operations to ensure staff members employ effective procedures.

Program Oversight

  • Maintains and revises programs of Supportive Housing Communities with input from COO, staff and Board.
  • Oversees eligibility guidelines and program requirements employing evidence-based client centered models.
  • With the COO, oversees a system that monitors program outcomes.
  • Regularly meets with residents and ensures that residents are treated fairly within the social work code of ethics and confidentiality law.
  • Creates an environment that is supportive of the residents, staff, community, Board and volunteers.

Maintenance and Property Management

  • Works with the COO to assure effective operations, building maintenance and routine inspections.

Performs other job duties as requested by the Board of Directors and committee chairs, within the scope of the position.

 

Required Qualifications & Competencies

The ideal candidate will have the following capabilities and qualities:

  • A demonstrated commitment to the SHC mission and the community in which it serves.
  • Ability to facilitate the mission of the organization and provide staff supervision while working in a nonprofit environment.
  • Ability to serve as a strategic visionary leader with a demonstrated track record as a change manager with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, financial management, program growth and development, relationship-building, and advocacy skills.
  • Fluent, cogent, oral and written communication skills, and the ability to present formally to senior management, Boardroom audiences, staff, residents, HUD, City of Charlotte and the community.
  • Ability to fundraise with sound knowledge of grant and contract writing, special events, direct mail, corporate giving, endowment programs and other relevant forms of development.
  • Previous experience in engaging Board relations, developing policies, goals and objectives (optimizing the inherent resources of board members) and onboarding and training new members.
  • Creative and compassionate attitude towards serving the homeless/formerly homeless population, with an ability to define win-win parameters on behalf of the agency and residents.
  • Integrity and well-defined principles, practical business instincts and the ability to adapt to corporate and nonprofit environments.
  • Master’s level degree required; and ten years of progressive leadership experience in field of low-income housing and/or homeless services or equivalent in human services.

To Apply

Supportive Housing Communities has partnered with Next Stage to help in this hire. All inquiries, nominations and applications should be directed via email to Next Stage (search@nextstage-consulting.com). Applications must include a compelling cover letter and CV to be considered for the role. Please also indicate where you learned of the opportunity. Please note that only those candidates invited for screening will be contacted. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Supportive Housing Communities provides equal employment opportunity to all persons without regard to race, color, creed, age, sex, religion, disability, nationality, or sexual orientation, and promotes the full realization of this policy through a positive, continuing program of affirmative action.

About Next Stage

Next Stage is a strategy and implementation firm based in Charlotte, NC and serving nonprofit organizations and social cause start-ups throughout the Carolinas. Next Stage works with nonprofit organizations to develop game-changing strategies and strengthened operations in service to mission and long-range vision. For more information about Next Stage, please visit nextstage-consulting.com.

#NonprofitBookClub: Social Startup Success

By Caylin Haldeman

2019 is off to the races, everyone. How are you doing on your resolutions?

Me? Work in progress. I made the resolution to read more books on things I feel passionate about. I even created a reading list of books that will help me get smarter on topics like affordable housing, notions of “community” and “belonging” and (shocking) nonprofits.

But man, it can be hard to find the time! Josh and I talk all the time about how to stay on top of all of the great thinking coming out of the nonprofit sector – both locally and in other communities. We listen to podcasts (On Life and Meaning, BrandBuilders and the Charlotte Podcast have all featured great local nonprofits lately) and read online publications like SSIR, yet I have been watching as my “to read” stack of nonprofit literature grows taller and taller on my bookshelf.

In late January, hundreds of nonprofits gathered together at Project 658 for SHARE Charlotte’s 2019 Nonprofit Summit. It was a packed day, with two panels featuring local nonprofit, philanthropic and corporate leaders and a keynote address by Kathleen Kelly Janus, social entrepreneur and author of Social Startup Success: How the Best Nonprofits Launch, Scale Up and Make A Difference. Which just so happens to be one of those books in my stack…

I took that as a sign from the universe – “Get to reading, Caylin.”

So, I did. Here’s what I learned, organized by four ideas Kathleen presented during her keynote:

Nonprofits Must Invest in Themselves – This, I would argue, is the crux of the book – and just so happens to be one of Next Stage’s organizing philosophies, too. Too often, organizations are subject to the nonprofit starvation cycle, in which nonprofits underspend and underreport on overhead expenses due to unrealistic funder expectations.

In her book, Kathleen presents five core strategies for nonprofit success: testing ideas, measuring impact, funding experimentation, leading collaboratively and telling compelling stories. Each of these strategies requires deep investment – of time, resources and brand.

Nonprofits Must Harness the Passion of the Next Generation – According to Kathleen’s research, 55% of millennials say that they choose companies to work for because of their commitment to social good. Other research shows that 75% of millennials would even take a pay cut to work for a more socially responsible company. As Next Stage’s resident millennial, I feel like I can vouch for this: the next generation really cares about engaging in social good.

But we are also discerning in how we engage with nonprofits, in a way that diverges from the generations that have preceded us. While donors have zeroed in on evidence and efficiency in recent decades, the next generation has demonstrated an appetite for risk-taking, ambitious vision and bold story-telling. Nonprofits have to shift data collection and analysis, fundraising and communication strategies to meet these changing priorities, testing new strategies to harness the support of next-gen volunteers and donors.

Nonprofits Must Cultivate More Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – This is an unfortunate truth in the nonprofit sector: philanthropy often presents an inherent bias toward a nonprofit’s pedigree of leadership over an authentic representation of the community it serves. And due to the unique nature of the nonprofit structure, the sector tends to organically organize itself around philanthropic demand.

This means that the most successful nonprofits are typically the ones most aligned with this bias – organizations headed by well-connected, well-resourced and credentialed leaders. But in recent years, there has been increasing emphasis on the importance of cultivating diversity, equity and inclusion in the nonprofit sector both from nonprofits themselves and from funders. While this topic was a huge theme of Kathleen’s keynote address, I was disappointed to see that it does not play a central role in her recommendations related to cultivating collective leadership in Social Startup Success.

Donors Must Invest in Nonprofits – Nonprofit leaders have long championed efforts to reframe the way donors understand “overhead” and instead highlight capacity building – not program funding – as the key to unlocking more sustainable nonprofit business models. Frequently, donors will pair an investment with specific, restrictive expectations about its usage and impact. Kathleen calls this “donor entitlement,” and if you’ve spent any time working for a nonprofit, I bet you’ve run into it.

While the tides of donor attitude toward capacity building are slowly changing, many nonprofits develop alternative fundraising strategies to cover operating costs. As Josh explored in a recent article for his Breaking Good column in the Biscuit, Forget “Charity.” Think Like a Business, earned income is an underutilized method of revenue generation for many nonprofits. Kathleen leans into this notion, dedicating two chapters within the theme of funding experimentation to an exploration of how to build successful earned income strategies.

In sum, Social Startup Success was full of well-researched strategies for organizational strengthening, and was a great kick-off for my new monthly series on the Next Stage blog: #NonprofitBookClub. What should I read next?

P.S. I have to give a shout out to our friends at SHARE Charlotte for all that they do to champion local nonprofits – their leadership has done so much to strengthen our community’s supportive infrastructure through the encouragement of philanthropic giving, volunteer engagement and other forms of charitable involvement. Facilitating conversations about topics like the ones presented in Social Startup Success will make all of our work more effective. If your nonprofit has not yet joined their online platform, I encourage you to check it out.

Our Firm’s Next Stage

by Josh Jacobson

We are proud to announce that our firm is rebranding… err, sort of…

Going forward, we will be known simply as Next Stage, dropping the word Consulting. Our new(ish) logo is above.

In truth, I never thought I would become a consultant. When I moved to Charlotte from New York City a decade ago, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do when I grew up. I felt I had climbed the mountain of fundraising for the performing arts and was prepared to run an organization. And I was pretty sure it wouldn’t be a cultural nonprofit. I had (and have) so many passions.

In 2008, Charlotte was a very different place than it is now. This was Charlotte just before the onset of the Great Recession and being a new guy from out of town rendered me persona non grata. “But who do you know locally?” I knew very few people. What I did know was process and strategy – I had learned best practices from some of the strongest nonprofit executives I will ever meet. But without a local network, I was going to have a tough road ahead. Indeed, people who turned me down for positions then are now friends and colleagues.

I share this because working as a consultant was not in my mind when I arrived in Charlotte. Without other options, and honestly without a clear direction of what I wanted to be in the nonprofit sector anyway, I reluctantly took up the title. And during my 10,000 hours learning the profession, a seed was planted that germinated as Next Stage.

It took a while – in fact, it took years – but nonprofits in Charlotte finally did wake up to the need for stronger leadership and resource development regardless of local footprint. Now, a talented professional from out of town is a coveted executive in our nonprofit sector. I was asked recently to assist with a nonprofit search where the preference was for someone not from Charlotte. Let that sink in for a minute.

My firm started in January 2014 with the charge to change what consulting could be. We sought to partner deeply with the nonprofits we serve, doing the homework needed to earn the right to offer assistance. We recalibrated the high cost of local consulting purposefully, to make strategy help affordable for many more types of organizations. And we sought out innovators and big thinkers – people who would be willing to invest in the partnership as deeply as we do.

The result? Another 10,000 hours and more than 100 nonprofit engagements later, Next Stage is reborn. While we have always seen ourselves as a social entrepreneurship company serving as a tool of community leaders on both sides of the philanthropic divide, we now understand the true nature of work. We see real gaps in our community – gaps that we feel called to help fill. Following last year’s addition of Caylin Haldeman as Next Stage’s Project Development Manager, we are expanding our model to serve Charlotte’s nonprofit and philanthropic communities by building out capacities that allow us to explore local challenges to our sector.

We feel we have already redefined what consulting can be, but it is a word that will always conjure different things for different people. We remain deeply committed to consulting with nonprofits – what we now call client partnerships – but we see a new horizon for our work.

Going forward, we are committing to three distinct lines of business:

  • Client Partnerships – We are extraordinarily proud of our 100+ engagements with nonprofits across the Carolinas, with a concentration in our hometown of Charlotte, NC. We believe that area nonprofits benefit from our efforts to dive deeply into organizational strengthening and resource development. As we look to the future, our goal is to serve as Charlotte’s go-to firm for vision-centric planning and implementation, and we welcome your help connecting with organizations seeking stellar counsel.
  • CULTIVATE – Our incubator for emerging nonprofits launched as a pilot in 2018 with participants including Charlotte is Creative, Promising Pages and Learning Help Centers of Charlotte. Early returns have been extremely positive, with each of these organizations taking substantial steps toward deepening impact and increasing sustainability. Next Stage is planning to expand the program in 2019. The application will be available beginning in early September 2018, so please help us source amazing founder-led organizations.
  • Thought Leadership – In early 2019, Next Stage will be publishing a research-informed report examining the challenges and opportunities of talent recruitment and retention in Charlotte’s nonprofit sector. Helping improve the ability of local nonprofits to source and keep talent is emerging as a leading issue facing our community, and Next Stage sees a need for leadership on this topic. This research begins in summer 2018, and we hope you will help us by responding to our requests for survey participation and interviews.

It’s a new day at Next Stage. We look forward to serving you – all of you.