A Guide to Social Distancing for Nonprofit Program Staff

By Caylin Haldeman

Now that we’re all on board with social distancing, many of us are starting to settle into a new routine (can we call it a routine yet?) of working from home. Here at Next Stage, we are hosting conference calls, navigating technical challenges and connectivity problems on Google Hangouts, and trying to manage the competing demands of our coworkers and families.

But there are so many people still at work out in the community: grocery store employees, healthcare providers, police officers and firefighters, just to name a few. Many companies aren’t structurally able to transition to remote work – and others simply can’t afford to.

Nonprofits vary widely in their ability to operate remotely, and we know that many are working hard this week to restructure programs and augment activities during this time of transition. In the midst of all of these changes – economic instability, growing unemployment rates, increased home education and childcare needs – we know that our nonprofits are often the frontline of support.

So in the age of social distancing, how should local organizations think about shifting their programmatic priorities to meet the changing needs of our community?

We are in the thick of it ourselves, anticipating the changes we will need to make over the next few weeks to ensure CULTIVATE can pivot to meet the immediate needs of our cohort while still achieving our goal of helping them build long-range strategic business plans. Here’s how we are approaching changes to program implementation in the age of social distancing:

1.    Protect Your People

As of today, the general consensus is to follow Mecklenburg County guidelines: gatherings of more than 50 people have been prohibited, a State of Emergency has been declared, and residents are expected to follow everyday prevention practices to avoid getting sick. Our first priority should always be our people – our colleagues, our volunteers, our families and our communities. It is in everyone’s best interest to follow recommendations related to social distancing until we are able to reduce chances for community transmission of COVID-19.

We have seen organizations and businesses postpone in-person programs and volunteer opportunities and pivot to services that accommodate social distance – using drop-off or pick-up methods to provide resources while reducing in-person interaction, transitioning to virtual meetings for human services support, and creating new online platforms for engagement.

Before anything else, we recommend taking a step back to ensure that your organization is doing everything it can to protect your people. We know it can be tempting to run at the big challenges right away, but our community will be stronger and better off if we give ourselves the chance to breathe, adjust to our new reality and make sure we are taking care of one another. Once policies and procedures are in place that help volunteers, staff and participants stay safe and healthy, nonprofit leaders can start to think creatively about the future.

2.    Assess Changing Community Needs 

As this situation evolves, it will be critical to understand how your constituents have been impacted by economic and community shifts. When appropriate, reach out and ask for feedback to understand what has changed and where new priorities have surfaced.

The CULTIVATE curriculum introduces our cohort to the Community Needs Assessment – an exercise meant to help leaders understand the scope of need within their mission focus area and where they fit within a broad system of resources. It is safe to assume that community needs within most focus areas have changed since just one month ago, and regular checkpoints should be established to keep your nonprofit’s programming informed and responsive

3.    Adjust Accordingly

We’re in uncharted territory right now, with the perfect storm of the Coronavirus pandemic and economic downturn looming on the horizon – and the reality is that there are not really any established best practices on which to rely. Next Stage is here to remind you of the intrinsic strength that exists within the individuals on your team – your volunteers, your leadership staff, and the people who are served by your programs. Tap into that strength to understand how to pivot and give yourself the grace of time to figure out what comes next. We are here to help. 

For additional support, please check out the following groups who are coordinating resources to help nonprofits continue to provide needed programs in the community: 

Apparo – Local IT nonprofit Apparo is hosting a free webinar to help nonprofits adjust to remote work. More info can be found here: Ensuring Nonprofit Remote Work Success (A Virtual Q&A)

Charlotte Community ToolBankThe Charlotte Community ToolBank will happily provide tables, chairs, tents, and other equipment free of charge to those responding and directly supporting the COVID-19 pandemic. If your organization is providing free lunches, sorting food for families practicing self-isolation, staging pop-up testing sites, etc., and has a need for our equipment, please call us at 704.469.5800. We are here to help!

CLT COVID-19 Resource List – A grassroot coalition of community leaders, including Stefania Arteaga and Comunidad Collectiva, Tyler Miller and For Charlotte, Tina Marshall, Kass Ottley, Gemini Boyd and others have created a living document of resources and ways to help. To add resources to this list, contact us and we will put you in touch with its editors.

SHARE Charlotte – SHARE Charlotte is launching #SHAREFromHome, a new platform that empowers the community to do good while practicing social distance. For more information and ways to get involved with local nonprofits, check out the SHARE From Home website.

Spring Forward: Top 10 To-Dos

by Josh Jacobson

Is it really going to be 76 degrees today? And yes, I still put on a sweater vest this morning. It will remain winter if only in my mind.

In truth, March is early spring – there’s no getting around it. And as such, it is a time for us to consider springing forward for the ~80% of nonprofits with a June 30 fiscal year. Here are Next Stage’s top ten suggestions for making the most of the next few months:

  1. Staff Assessment & One-on-One Meetings – We all know that April and May bring a lot of staff turnover, but we wonder if it has to be that way. Sit down with your staff member before the onset of the human resources musical chairs to discuss their career, their pathway with the organization and how to help them reach their potential. It can make a huge difference toward retaining talent.
  2. Complete the Audit & 990 Submission – Ugh, we know. No one particularly loves the audit process and/or the effort to submit the 990 Form to the IRS. Rather than see it as a hateful exercise, use it as an opportunity to reflect on the previous year and get familiar with your stats. Analyzing financial performance is a critical component of nonprofit strengthening.
  3. Review the List of LYBUNTs – Of course, we all know the term LYBUNT, so I hardly need to define it, right? No? It stands for Last Year But Unfortunately Not This, and it refers to past donors who for whatever reason have not yet made a gift during your current fiscal year. Do you know who is on this list? If not, we recommend that you do.
  4. Ensure Sponsorship Fulfillment – Our sponsors care about mission – it is part of why they sponsor you. But make no mistake, sponsorship is earned revenue. Your organization earns it by fulfilling the expectations contained in the sponsorship agreement. It might be time to dust those off and make sure you are on track.
  5. Make Your Top-10 List for Coffee – The clock is ticking and pretty soon it will be too late to try to get people to meet for coffee. I heard it call “June-tober” – the idea that if you don’t have it on the calendar by the start of June, it will likely take until October to get it back on the calendar. Tempus fugit! Reach out and get that meeting locked down.
  6. Prepare for Summer Projects – Too many nonprofit leaders wake up on July 1 and have no idea how they are going to leverage a two-month respite before the fiscal year starts picking up again with the arrival of fall. Don’t be one of them. Make your summer plan now and get folks ready to run when the time comes.
  7. Clean Up the Database – “Garbage in, garbage out.” It is a truism for a reason. The messy constituent relationship management (CRM) database will never do what you need it to do if it is full of mislabeled and poorly-entered data. Make a commitment, set a deadline and get your team focused on a spring data cleaning.
  8. Review Your Marketing Plan – Did we reach the population segments we hoped to reach this year? If so, what made us successful? If not, is it too late the figure that out? (here’s a hint: it is not too late) The beautiful marketing plan you built last summer has suffered the slings and arrows of practicality all fiscal year long. It’s time to level set, fill gaps and double-down on successes.
  9. Prepare Storytelling Content – Spring is event season, which also means it is storytelling season. Every organization should be building a new set of stories to share that illuminate the pursuit of mission. Who are the people your organization has engaged or served over the last 9 months? It is time to capture those testimonials and share those stories.
  10. Schedule a Happy Hour to Celebrate – Amiright? We here at Next Stage always encourage the proper and appropriate imbibing of alcohol to celebrate the year that was. After you’ve made it through our top ten list, you deserve as frosty beverage of your choice. But only one… okay, maybe two.

What are your must-happen activities before June 30? Share them on our social pages!

Job Announcement: Ada Jenkins Center, Executive Director

Ada Jenkins Center (AJC)

Executive Director  – Position Description

Location:           Ada Jenkins Center, 212 Gamble Street, Davidson, NC 28036

Reports To:       Board of Directors

 

Organizational Overview

Mission

Ada Jenkins Center exists to help people in our community create lasting solutions for economic stability.

About the Organization

The Ada Jenkins Center, in Davidson’s historic west side community, serves as a resource hub for approximately 900 client-partners annually on a budget of $3.5 million. The Center focuses services on eligible individuals and families who live in Davidson, Cornelius, and Huntersville.

For more than 25 years, the Ada Jenkins Center has been north Mecklenburg’s answer for unmet social needs. Often, when individuals and families come through the doors at Ada Jenkins Center, they are facing a crisis. Sometimes, the need is specific such as acquisition of a medical or dental home. Other times, the needs are multiple and seemingly without end. Based on the situation, client-partners work with the organization’s Coordinated Services team to first assess eligibility for programs and services and then choose the right mix of supports to uniquely meet their needs. Core services are Education (adult and child), Housing/Workforce Development, Free Medical Clinic, Mobile Dental Unit, and Coordinated Services.

The organization is unique among area service providers in its dedication to bridging federal, state and nonprofit programs that too often operate in isolation. The Ada Jenkins Center’s integrated, multi-generational approach is based on a premise that positive health outcomes (physical and mental) will lead to positive education/employment outcomes and a consequential increase in family economic stability, which, in turn, will improve a child’s (physical and academic) well-being. Stable, healthy, safe children reduce adult stressors and contribute to the well-being of adults. The loop continues with positive outcomes for all family members and successive generations. This model is the only fully integrated and holistic one locally, partnering with many area providers to avoid duplication.

For more about Ada Jenkins Center please visit adajenkins.org.

The Opportunity

At a time when economic mobility has been identified as a critical challenge in our communities, Ada Jenkins Center focuses our resources and efforts to work with families seeking long-lasting solutions and change. The organization has revised its mission statement and service delivery model in recent years to focus on economic stability. Recognizing that this work does not occur in a vacuum, the Center intentionally engages with a wealth of other community partners who also support this commitment to change. The Executive Director will take the reins of a well-respected organization with a twenty-plus history of serving the community, an outstanding reputation, and a compassionate team driven to meet the need for long-term economic stability in north Mecklenburg County.

The Role

The Executive Director (ED) will be a visionary leader with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, relationship-building, and advocacy skills. Reporting to the Board of Directors, the ED is responsible for overall leadership and operations of Ada Jenkins Center including personnel, finances, mission delivery, communication, fund development, and management. The ED will continue organizational development and further its sustainability in conjunction with staff, Board, and stakeholders.

The ED embodies, and serves as chief role model for, the Center’s Guiding Principles: Relationships Driven by promoting a culture of trust and respect, Mission Drive and Excellence, and a Steward of Resources.

Key responsibilities include:

Strategic Leadership and Board Relations

  • Works in partnership with Board members, to assist them in their board operations, administration, planning, and information dissemination.
  • Helps build, sustain, and strengthen all Board functions including meetings, policy adherence, and committee work.
  • Communicates regularly with the Board and engages the Board in meaningful participation to further AJC goals.
  • Works with members of the Board to help identify and onboard new members to further advance the AJC mission.
  • Ensures implementation of organization policies, services and goals as approved by the Board.
  • Serves as a strategic, visionary leader with the ability to proactively communicate how specific priorities are driving overall business goals to key stakeholders, staff and Board.
  • Utilizes a dynamic strategic plan that leads to viable, comprehensive growth for AJC.
  • Oversees all operations of the organization, working in partnership with the Board, appropriate committees, and the Senior Leadership team.
  • Engages and collaborates with the Senior Leadership team: Director of Operations, Director of Development, and Director of Impact and Engagement. Oversees all AJC personnel.

Relationship Building for Resource Development

  • Serves as the organization’s lead spokesperson and relationship-builder in the community, acquiring and nurturing relationships that advance Ada Jenkins Center’s mission.
  • Expands public awareness, representing the organization within the community, including the media. Explores ways for Ada Jenkins Center to gain new external support and resources.
  • Maintains relationships with major donors of the organization and shares critical information with development staff for appropriate donor stewardship.
  • Cultivates trusting positive relationships with philanthropic foundations, corporations, individual donors, faith-based organizations, and local, county, federal, and state governments to support growth of the organization.
  • In conjunction with the Director of Development, and with an entrepreneurial spirit, develops diverse funding streams including the possibility of earned income revenue.
  • Anticipates spending at least 50% of the time focused on this category.

Financial Performance and Viability

Alongside the Director of Operations:

  • Maintains the fiscal integrity of AJC by submitting monthly financial statements, income, and expense forecast updates, and proposed annual budgets that accurately reflect the financial condition of the organization to the Finance Committee and Board.
  • Provides fiscal management that generally anticipates operating within the approved budget, ensures maximum resource utilization, and maintenance of the organization in a positive financial position.
  • Builds and/or maintains a healthy operating reserve that mirrors nonprofit best financial practice, as well as a capital reserve available for unexpected events.
  • Delivers financial records that are organized and maintained and confirms that ethical accounting standards are followed with effective checks and balances.
  • Ensures completion of annual independent financial audit and IRS Form 990.

Organizational Operations

  • Provides inspiration and encouragement to staff, continuing to foster a cohesive, inclusive, and positive team culture with an emphasis on work-life balance.
  • Conducts regular staff meetings to ensure that staff works as “One AJC Team” to achieve the organization’s mission and goals.
  • Develops strategic goals and key performance indicators (KPIs) to define and measure team and outcomes.
  • Promotes the on-going culture of coaching, as well as personal and professional development opportunities for all staff.
  • Maintains cohesive and collaborative Leadership teams.
  • Alongside the Director of Operations:
  • Oversees and implements appropriate resources to ensure that the operations of the organization are sufficient.
  • Ensures that sound and legally compliant human resource practices are in place and they align with the organization’s mission, guiding principles and strategic plan.
  • Recognizes that staff are the organization’s greatest asset. Prioritizes retaining a competent, passionate, and diverse staff to appropriately meet the strategic needs of AJC.
  • Maintains effective and safe facility operations, authorizes necessary campus repairs and maintenance, as well as routine inspections.
  • Provides direction and guidance on facility capital maintenance and renovation projects with AJC’s strategic plan and future in mind, while maintaining the historical integrity of the site.

Mission Delivery

  • Promotes an environment that places client-partners at the forefront of all decision-making.
  • With an eye towards social justice, provides consultation and guidance about the on-going visioning and planning of service delivery to fulfill the mission.
  • Shares information with the Board and appropriate committees regarding mission, model, or service changes.
  • With the Director of Impact and Mission Team:
  • Establishes outcomes, tracks progress and evaluates achievement in reaching service and mission goals.
  • Develops collaborative relationships with other service agencies, including the government and faith communities and other entities.
  • Participates in community strategic planning to maximize community resources while maintaining the vision and mission of the organization

Performs other job duties as requested by the Board of Directors and committee chairs, within the scope of the position.

Required Qualifications & Competencies

The ideal candidate will have the following capabilities and qualities:

  • Demonstrated commitment to the AJC mission of economic stability, our client-partner families, and the North Mecklenburg community.
  • Familiarity with North Mecklenburg County funders, leaders, and community groups preferred.
  • Community leader for systemic change preferred.
  • Experience consistently raising funds and managing an organizational budget of greater than $1.5M.
  • Experience managing, coaching, and genuinely relating to a diverse team of full and part-time staff of approximately thirty, as well as a cadre of volunteers who supplement the AJC work-force on a daily basis.
  • Ability to serve as a strategic visionary leader, with a demonstrated track record as a change manager with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, financial management, strategic planning, service delivery model growth and development, relationship-building, and advocacy skills.
  • Fluent, cogent, oral and written communication skills, and the ability to present formally and informally to client-partners, staff, volunteers, community partners, Boardroom audiences, government and other key and potential stakeholders.
  • Experience setting organization-wide strategic goals and effectively leveraging the skills of employees to achieve goals.
  • Previous experience in engaging Board relations, developing policies, goals and objectives (optimizing the inherent resources of board members) and onboarding and training new members.
  • Demonstrated competence in reading, creating, and understanding financial documents, including budgets, cash flow, income statements, balance statements, and statements of functional expenses.
  • Creative and compassionate attitude towards serving families working toward economic stability, with an ability to define win-win parameters on behalf of AJC, our client-partner families, and the community.
  • Integrity and well-defined principles, practical business instincts and the ability to adapt to corporate and nonprofit environments.
  • Demonstrated ability to negotiate, collaborate, and foster inclusiveness among a wide range of people with diverse backgrounds.
  • Bachelor’s degree required.
  • A minimum of five years of senior leadership experience required; preferably in the social good or nonprofit sector.

To Apply

Ada Jenkins Center has partnered with Next Stage to help in this hire. All inquiries, nominations and applications should be directed via email to Next Stage (search@nextstage-consulting.com). Applications must include a compelling cover letter and resume to be considered for the role. Please also indicate where you learned of the opportunity. Please note that only those candidates invited for screening will be contacted. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Ada Jenkins Center provides equal employment opportunity to all persons without regard to race, color, creed, age, sex, religion, disability, nationality, or sexual orientation, and promotes the full realization of this policy through a positive, continuing program of affirmative action.

 

About Next Stage

Next Stage is a strategy and implementation firm based in Charlotte, NC and serves nonprofit organizations and social cause start-ups throughout the Carolinas. Next Stage works with nonprofit organizations to develop game-changing strategies and strengthened operations in service to mission and long-range vision. For more information about Next Stage, please visit nextstage-consulting.com.

 

Banu Valladares Cares About Spanish-Speaking Children

The article below was published by The Biscuit as a part of Josh’s new series highlighting staff leaders in Charlotte’s nonprofit sector who are shaking things up and making an impact. You can find it, here.

 

Banu Valladares is on fire.

Prepping for an important board meeting, she knows Charlotte Bilingual Preschool’s future will be determined in that room with the adoption of a game-changing new strategic plan. A task force of board members and staff had worked for months to think through how to increase impact and now it was go-time.

It was the most important vote of Valladares’ 2+ year tenure as executive director of Charlotte Bilingual Preschool. For over two decades, the preschool has provided innovative, two-generation solutions preparing Spanish-speaking children for success in life.

“My StrengthsFinder strengths are strategic thinking, maximizer and positivity,” Valladares shares later. “So, needless to say, I was ready for that conversation.”

 

 

 

‘THOUGHT ROCKET’

Full disclosure: I am the consultant who worked with Charlotte Bilingual Preschool on their recent strategic planning effort. It was one of the most ambitious and inspirational efforts of my career.

The opportunity to partner with the organization was a no-brainer, since I sourced Valladares for the executive director role in the first place.

In 2017, the preschool hired Next Stage to help find the next leader of their organization and truth be told, it did not go very well at first. As told to me by Claire Tate, a child advocate and civic leader who has served as a longtime board member for the organization. Her initial opinion of our work was not all that strong.

Next Stage always starts by engaging the board of directors in order to understand the must-have qualities they are seeking in a successful candidate. In this case, the initial priority of the board was finding someone with deep experience in preschool education. Sourcing a Latinx candidate who reflects the community served, while important, was considered a lower priority.

Boy, was that the wrong direction.

When it became clear to all of us that a Latinx candidate with a varied social good background that includes education would be considered favorably, one name came immediately to mind: Banu Valladares. She wowed the search committee.

Valladares came to Charlotte Bilingual Preschool from the NC Humanities Council where she worked in program and grants administration, partnership-development and special collaborations. Before that, she worked for the NC Arts Council in a number of program management roles. She had also served as an interim principal for Charlotte-based Community Charter School and, for many years, as a translator developing school recruitment materials, arts-integrated learning and creative curriculum.

The search committee started by prioritizing practical experience of teaching in a preschool setting. In the end, they landed a courageous futurist, sometimes called a ‘thought rocket,’ who sees her work, in partnership with her board, as a crusade to empower families.

And everyone who meets Valladares loves her. This is not hyperbole.

 

STEPPING UP

Scoring a meeting with Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio is no easy task. In a town of busy people, she is one of the busiest. Her time is precious. Getting an hour with her and her team to unpack Charlotte Bilingual Preschool’s new strategic plan was quite a coup.

And, Valladares was ready. As she starts speaking, she was choked up. The importance of the conversation she was having came with it a rush of emotions. It was clear that she felt (and feels) deeply, almost spiritually committed to bringing more resources and programming to Charlotte’s growing Spanish-speaking community.

“I see this work as a legacy, for all of us, a legacy of impact we can all be proud to have set in motion,” Valladares said.

Charlotte Bilingual Preschool currently serves roughly 150 students in classrooms annexed to the organization at Hickory Grove Elementary School in East Charlotte. But, the need in the Charlotte community for dual-language early education is great. More than 3,000 Spanish-speaking children who enter kindergarten without the benefit of preschool every year.

That was the reason for the meeting with Diorio, to discuss new strategies for reaching radically more youth annually. Without giving too much away as the organization works to formalize the plan into action, the meeting went very well.

Claire Tate was in the room, as well. She has seen the preschool grow from an idea into one of Charlotte’s most admired nonprofits. Watching Tate and Valladares in action, it’s clear that they are aligned as crusaders.

“In public meetings, she speaks with passion and confidence, always impressing her audience,” Tate said. “Banu has been a wonderfully effective leader.”

 

A BEAUTIFUL VISION

The preschool’s Board Treasurer, Manuel Arrese, sees Valladares’ leadership as essential to making this more ambitious internal culture a reality.One of the most significant changes at Charlotte Bilingual Preschool over the last two years has been the addition of more Latinx leaders to its board of directors, now representing 50% of governance. This shift was meaningful to the recent strategic planning effort. It was critical to transforming the preschool from a development culture of modest growth and responsible stewardship into one of responsible risk-taking.

“Banu dreams and shoots for the moon, inspiring her team while at the same time developing concrete plans to meet annual goals,” Arrese said. “She aligns her team and demands of them what she demands of herself: dedication and high performance.”

Disrupting the status quo is a part of what makes Valladares such a dynamic leader, and she backs it up with thoughtful approaches to change management grounded in ‘what could be.’ As a Latinx leader, she is uniquely well-positioned to take an organization like Charlotte Bilingual Preschool to the next level.

“Charlotte is a city that has had a number of challenges in recent years with regard to racial harmony and building equity,” Valladares said. “Now imagine Charlotte being synonymous with best-in-class dual-language early education, to be known for that nationally.”

“Just picture it,” she concludes.

A beautiful vision indeed.

Job Announcement: Heart Math Tutoring, Community Outreach Director

Heart Math Tutoring (“Heart Tutoring”)

Community Outreach Director– Position Description

Location:          1100 S. Mint Street, #107, Charlotte, NC 28203

Reports To:       Executive Director

 

Organization Overview

Mission

Heart Tutoring’s mission is to ensure that all elementary students develop the strong foundation in math and enthusiasm for academics needed for long-term success, by helping schools use volunteers as tutors.

Overview

Heart Tutoring is a math intervention program that recruits, trains, and supports volunteers as tutors in high-poverty elementary schools in Charlotte, NC. Community members commit one hour per week to deliver an effective, hands-on curriculum through one-on-one tutoring sessions during the school day in high-poverty elementary schools.

Heart Tutoring believes volunteer tutors can be a powerful resource for students if given tools and support, and we believe all children can achieve high levels of understanding in math – a critical competency impacting long-term opportunity. As such, Heart Tutoring recruits and supports 1,280 volunteers as tutors across 23 Charlotte elementary schools with a mission of ensuring that all elementary students develop the strong foundation in math and enthusiasm for academics needed for long-term success. We focus on students who are economically disadvantaged in low opportunity areas. The program became a 501c3 nonprofit in July 2014.

To date, 98% of Heart students have met program growth goals, and over 90% of math teachers report that students show an increase in enthusiasm and/or confidence towards academics as a result of the program. Over the next five years, Heart Tutoring seeks to grow its services from supporting 1,150 students (23 schools) to 2,000 students (35-40 schools) in Charlotte while sharing the model with other cities.

For more information about Heart Tutoring, please visit hearttutoring.org.

 

Opportunity

Volunteers are the lifeblood of Heart Tutoring. Building relationships with key institutional gatekeepers, the Director will play a critical role in cultivating the volunteer base needed to give hundreds more students math skills, encouragement from a caring adult, and long-term success. Reporting to the Executive Director, the Director will work laterally with Program Managers, Development staff, and other departments to meet annual tutor recruitment goals, which are expected to grow from 1,300 tutors today to over 2,250 tutors annually five years from now.

 

The Role

The Director will be responsible for leading and executing Heart Tutoring’s strategic plan to sustain and grow engaged partnerships to support volunteer tutor recruitment goals. The Director will be a key player individually in identifying, cultivating, and stewarding new volunteer partnerships and volunteers and serve as the lead contact for a caseload of partnerships. As a member of the Leadership Team, the Director will also serve as project manager, planning and coordinating the full team’s efforts and coaching staff to secure new volunteers and volunteer partners to provide tutoring to a growing number of students each year.  Key responsibilities include:

Strategic Planning

  • Develop and lead a comprehensive and diversified strategy to sustain and grow the volunteer tutor base of Heart Math Tutoring, including cultivation of organization partners, individuals, federal work study students, and other creative sources.
  • Follow current trends and development in the local community to inform cross-sector partnership strategy
  • Provide goals, accountability, resources, and coaching to Program Managers, development staff, other departments, and volunteer ambassadors to support effective outreach and retention of org partners and individual volunteers.
  • Measure progress and adjust strategy to ensure 50 students per school have the tutors needed by October 1 and a 95% fill rate from there (measured 12/1, 1/1, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1).
  • Work in partnership with Program Manger Team on new school recruitment, advising on feasibility of potential new school sites and planning for success at each one.
  • Lead the creation of volunteer recruitment pitches, advertisements, and strategic messaging for community partners.

Partnership Development

  • Identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward top-level organization partners in collaboration with the Executive Director, Development Director, Board of Directors, and full team.
  • Establish and build relationships with new organization partners.
  • Recruit individual tutors within partner organizations by making pitches and building relationships within organizations.
  • Identify leads, make asks, and build relationships in the community to recruit individual tutors for students.
  • Represent Heart Tutoring at community events, tabling opportunities, networking events, and any other areas that support volunteer recruitment goals.
  • Set and achieve monthly and weekly recruitment outreach goals for yourself, adjusting goals and actions to achieve a conversion rate that enables 95% fill rate throughout the year.
  • Work with teammates in dual coverage models for organization outreach.
  • Support volunteer-related events and other program needs as assigned/feasible.

Team Leadership

  • Promote Heart Tutoring’s core values and positive culture throughout. Promote a culture of philanthropy and collaboration across functional areas.
  • Inspire staff, volunteers and donors to act with urgency to ensure all students develop the strong foundation in math and enthusiasm for academics they need for long-term success.
  • Strategically uses time, leveraging volunteers to accomplish goals with efficiency and quality.
  • Research, learn, and employ best practices in volunteer recruitment and management to maintain a strong foundation for Heart Tutoring’s volunteer outreach efforts.
  • Contribute positively to Heart’s team, providing leadership and a high bar for excellence.
  • Serves as a strong member of the Leadership Team, working with the Executive Director and others to help the organization maximize its impact, which includes supporting student outcomes, tutor retention, and fundraising goals.

 

Required Qualifications & Competencies

The ideal candidate exhibits Heart Tutoring’s core values, has strong leadership and relationship-building skills, and operates with a high level of organization and follow-through. The Director will be a reflective learner and will contribute positively to Heart Tutoring’s team, maintaining a high bar of excellence and leading the organization to increased impact. The ideal candidate would have the following capabilities and qualities:

  • Minimum of 7 years of professional experience in relationship development, community partnerships, corporate relations and/or sales/business development
  • A commitment to Heart Tutoring’s mission and maintains the strong belief that all students can learn and ultimately perform at or above grade level
  • Strong ability to make connections easily and create authentic relationships with a wide variety of individuals and groups
  • Ability to serve as spokesperson for Heart Tutoring, conveying the value of volunteerism to community partners and individuals
  • Demonstrated ability to effectively manage multiple projects, deadlines and creatively problem solve
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Proficiency with Google Suite, Microsoft Office and CRM software
  • Makes a strong, positive impression in networking and social settings; willing to make asks.
  • Able to teach, tailor, and lead others in sales/recruitment environments and has studied (or is willing to study) best practices in sales/recruitment
  • Track record of learning and adjusting course based on new information, including seeking and incorporating best practices from other orgs and sectors
  • Believes in importance of data and attention to detail and is highly organized and efficient
  • Operates with passion and sense of urgency in helping each child reach his/her full potential
  • Values and exhibits collaboration and teamwork, with internal and external partners
  • Enjoys multi-tasking and the fast pace of a growing organization, which requires planning and strategy in addition to flexibility and initiative

Some evening and early morning work may be required based on timing of community networking events, partner organization meetings (e.g., faith groups on weekends), and Heart Tutoring programming. Our strategy is to work collaboratively and proactively to establish a sustainable schedule, responsive to variation in season and priorities, and flexible when possible for remote vs. in-person work. We have a fast-paced environment.

To Apply

Heart Tutoring has partnered with Next Stage to help with this hire. All inquiries, nominations and applications should be directed via email to Next Stage (search@nextstage-consulting.com). Applications must include a compelling 1-page cover letter explaining your interest in the role and why you believe you are a good fit and a CV to be considered for the role. Please also indicate where you learned of the opportunity.

Heart Math Tutoring actively engages individuals from all backgrounds. We believe that our differences make our team stronger, and we also know that our students benefit from working with adults from all backgrounds. As an equal opportunity employer, Heart Math Tutoring is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified individuals and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, age, marital status, veteran status, pregnancy, parental status, genetic information or characteristics, or any other basis prohibited by applicable law.

About Next Stage

Next Stage is a strategy and implementation firm based in Charlotte, NC and serving nonprofit organizations and social cause start-ups throughout the Carolinas.  Next Stage works with nonprofit organizations to develop game-changing strategies and strengthened operations in service to mission and long-range vision. For more information about Next Stage, please visit nextstage-consulting.com.

Job Announcement: Supportive Housing Communities, Chief Executive Officer

SUPPORTIVE HOUSING COMMUNITIES (SHC)

Chief Executive Officer – Position Description

 

Title:                 Chief Executive Officer

Location:          Administrative Offices at the Children and Family Services Center, 601 E. Fifth Street, Suite 255, Charlotte, NC 28202

Reports To:       Board of Directors

 

Organizational Overview

Mission

The mission of Supportive Housing Communities is to provide affordable housing to alleviate homelessness and human suffering.

Vision

SHC’s vision is to develop and operate permanent supportive housing for men, women and families overcoming homelessness, especially veterans and those with mental illness, substance abuse, and medical or other disabling conditions.

Community and Residents

SHC is a leader in Charlotte for ending homelessness. While pioneering the concept of providing permanent supportive housing to homeless people with disabilities, the agency maintains a 97% success rate of keeping residents in stable housing.

SHC goals include assisting residents in obtaining/remaining in permanent housing, encouraging residents to increase skills and/or find employment, fostering self-sufficiency and improving self-image, and supporting recovery and wellness. SHC serves formerly homeless people with at least one disability. SHC residents must earn (through employment or earned benefits) less than 30% of area median income and contribute 30% of their income, if any, toward rent. All residents are homeless at the time of entry, with 82% being chronically homeless last fiscal year. SHC provides supportive housing to more than 300 residents on a budget of over $4 million.

Programs

  • McCreesh Place is the home to 90 formerly homeless men and women. Opening its doors in 2003, McCreesh Place was Charlotte’s first permanent supportive housing complex. McCreesh Place is a recovery-based housing model and the community includes programs to support recovery. At McCreesh Place, the community makes all the difference and proves that recovery within community works.
  • Scattered Site Housing provides residents safe homes in the community and SHC advocates on behalf of the residents and promotes positive relationships with landlords.
  • John’s Place is a 32-unit apartment building purchased in July 2017 to create more affordable apartments for chronically homeless individuals and families living with disabilities.
  • Project for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program focuses on providing street outreach to adults living in outside locations such as streets, camps, wooded areas, etc.

For more information about SHC visit supportivehousingcommunities.org.

The Opportunity

At a time when all eyes are on affordable housing in the Greater Charlotte region, SHC has taken significant strides forward to increase access for people in need. The organization has onboarded several new assets and programs in recent years, increasing its scale and impact. Following the transformational, decade-long tenure of a retiring leader, the new Chief Executive Officer is taking the reins of a growing agency with a compassionate team driven to meet the need for permanent supportive housing in the Queen City.

The Role

The CEO will be a visionary leader with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, relationship-building, and advocacy skills. Reporting to the Board of Directors, the CEO is responsible for overall leadership and operations of Supportive Housing Communities including personnel, finances, program growth and development, communication, fundraising and management of overall operations. SHC has experienced significant growth in recent years and the new CEO will continue growth and sustainability in conjunction with staff, Board and key stakeholders. Key responsibilities include:

Strategic Management and Leadership

  • Serves as a strategic, visionary leader with the ability to transparently communicate goals and vision to staff, Board and key stakeholders.
  • Oversees all operations of the agency, working in partnership with the Board of Directors and the appropriate committees.
  • Establishes a clear vision for continued growth and expansion for SHC.
  • Works closely with development, design, and oversight of program growth and expansion approved by the Board.
  • Provide direct supervision of Accounting Manager, Director of Development, Chief Operating Officer, Accounting Manager and outside accounting firm. Oversees all SHC personnel.

Board Relations

  • Communicates regularly with the Board and engages the Board in meaningful participation to further SHC goals.
  • Maintains an effective and collaborative relationship with the board and implements policies, programs and goals as established by the Board.
  • Works with members of the Board to help identify and onboard new members to further advance the SHC mission.

Community Building and Public Relations

  • Serves as the lead spokesperson and relationship-builder in the community. Initiates and strengthens relationships and collaborations with organizations and leaders connected to SHC mission and goals.
  • Develops collaborative relationships with other service agencies, including the government and faith communities and other entities.
  • Expands public and community awareness; representing the agency to the community, including the media.
  • Participates in community strategic planning to maximize community resources while maintaining vision and mission of the organization.
  • Oversees production of annual report and periodic newsletters.

Fundraising and Resource Development

  • Maintains relationships with major donors of the organization.
  • Explores ways for Supportive Housing Communities to gain support and resources.
  • Manages grants and reporting requirements; providing necessary documentation.
  • Cultivates trusting positive relationships with philanthropic foundations, corporations, individual donors, faith-based organizations, and city, county, federal, and state government to support growth of the organization.

Financial Management

  • Ensures that financial records are organized and maintained in partnership with the Board of Directors.
  • Identifies outside financial management resources.
  • Approves requisitions and ensures ethical accounting standards are followed by implementing
  • effective checks and balances.
  • Works with the Finance Committee and Board of Directors in maintaining monthly and annual financial/status reports on activities of the agency.
  • Manages the yearly budget process involving SHC staff.
  • Ensures fiscal stability. Develops and oversees annual budget after approval by Board of Directors.

Human Resources Oversight

  • Holds regular staff meetings. Provides coaching and encouragement to staff, fostering a cohesive, positive team culture working effectively to support SHC mission and goals.
  • Approves job descriptions and job duties.
  • Is ultimately responsible for the hiring of employees but may incorporate the help of supervising staff and/or board members.
  • Develops and implements annual salary administration plan within parameters defined by the Board of Directors.
  • Identifies and implements insurance coverage and other employee benefits.
  • Oversees annual performance reviews and maintains written records in personnel file as required by law.

Internal Policy

  • Oversees the development, updates, and distribution of internal policy and procedures.
  • Oversees daily operations to ensure staff members employ effective procedures.

Program Oversight

  • Maintains and revises programs of Supportive Housing Communities with input from COO, staff and Board.
  • Oversees eligibility guidelines and program requirements employing evidence-based client centered models.
  • With the COO, oversees a system that monitors program outcomes.
  • Regularly meets with residents and ensures that residents are treated fairly within the social work code of ethics and confidentiality law.
  • Creates an environment that is supportive of the residents, staff, community, Board and volunteers.

Maintenance and Property Management

  • Works with the COO to assure effective operations, building maintenance and routine inspections.

Performs other job duties as requested by the Board of Directors and committee chairs, within the scope of the position.

 

Required Qualifications & Competencies

The ideal candidate will have the following capabilities and qualities:

  • A demonstrated commitment to the SHC mission and the community in which it serves.
  • Ability to facilitate the mission of the organization and provide staff supervision while working in a nonprofit environment.
  • Ability to serve as a strategic visionary leader with a demonstrated track record as a change manager with excellent fundraising, administrative operations, financial management, program growth and development, relationship-building, and advocacy skills.
  • Fluent, cogent, oral and written communication skills, and the ability to present formally to senior management, Boardroom audiences, staff, residents, HUD, City of Charlotte and the community.
  • Ability to fundraise with sound knowledge of grant and contract writing, special events, direct mail, corporate giving, endowment programs and other relevant forms of development.
  • Previous experience in engaging Board relations, developing policies, goals and objectives (optimizing the inherent resources of board members) and onboarding and training new members.
  • Creative and compassionate attitude towards serving the homeless/formerly homeless population, with an ability to define win-win parameters on behalf of the agency and residents.
  • Integrity and well-defined principles, practical business instincts and the ability to adapt to corporate and nonprofit environments.
  • Master’s level degree required; and ten years of progressive leadership experience in field of low-income housing and/or homeless services or equivalent in human services.

To Apply

Supportive Housing Communities has partnered with Next Stage to help in this hire. All inquiries, nominations and applications should be directed via email to Next Stage (search@nextstage-consulting.com). Applications must include a compelling cover letter and CV to be considered for the role. Please also indicate where you learned of the opportunity. Please note that only those candidates invited for screening will be contacted. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Supportive Housing Communities provides equal employment opportunity to all persons without regard to race, color, creed, age, sex, religion, disability, nationality, or sexual orientation, and promotes the full realization of this policy through a positive, continuing program of affirmative action.

About Next Stage

Next Stage is a strategy and implementation firm based in Charlotte, NC and serving nonprofit organizations and social cause start-ups throughout the Carolinas. Next Stage works with nonprofit organizations to develop game-changing strategies and strengthened operations in service to mission and long-range vision. For more information about Next Stage, please visit nextstage-consulting.com.

#NonprofitBookClub: Social Startup Success

By Caylin Haldeman

2019 is off to the races, everyone. How are you doing on your resolutions?

Me? Work in progress. I made the resolution to read more books on things I feel passionate about. I even created a reading list of books that will help me get smarter on topics like affordable housing, notions of “community” and “belonging” and (shocking) nonprofits.

But man, it can be hard to find the time! Josh and I talk all the time about how to stay on top of all of the great thinking coming out of the nonprofit sector – both locally and in other communities. We listen to podcasts (On Life and Meaning, BrandBuilders and the Charlotte Podcast have all featured great local nonprofits lately) and read online publications like SSIR, yet I have been watching as my “to read” stack of nonprofit literature grows taller and taller on my bookshelf.

In late January, hundreds of nonprofits gathered together at Project 658 for SHARE Charlotte’s 2019 Nonprofit Summit. It was a packed day, with two panels featuring local nonprofit, philanthropic and corporate leaders and a keynote address by Kathleen Kelly Janus, social entrepreneur and author of Social Startup Success: How the Best Nonprofits Launch, Scale Up and Make A Difference. Which just so happens to be one of those books in my stack…

I took that as a sign from the universe – “Get to reading, Caylin.”

So, I did. Here’s what I learned, organized by four ideas Kathleen presented during her keynote:

Nonprofits Must Invest in Themselves – This, I would argue, is the crux of the book – and just so happens to be one of Next Stage’s organizing philosophies, too. Too often, organizations are subject to the nonprofit starvation cycle, in which nonprofits underspend and underreport on overhead expenses due to unrealistic funder expectations.

In her book, Kathleen presents five core strategies for nonprofit success: testing ideas, measuring impact, funding experimentation, leading collaboratively and telling compelling stories. Each of these strategies requires deep investment – of time, resources and brand.

Nonprofits Must Harness the Passion of the Next Generation – According to Kathleen’s research, 55% of millennials say that they choose companies to work for because of their commitment to social good. Other research shows that 75% of millennials would even take a pay cut to work for a more socially responsible company. As Next Stage’s resident millennial, I feel like I can vouch for this: the next generation really cares about engaging in social good.

But we are also discerning in how we engage with nonprofits, in a way that diverges from the generations that have preceded us. While donors have zeroed in on evidence and efficiency in recent decades, the next generation has demonstrated an appetite for risk-taking, ambitious vision and bold story-telling. Nonprofits have to shift data collection and analysis, fundraising and communication strategies to meet these changing priorities, testing new strategies to harness the support of next-gen volunteers and donors.

Nonprofits Must Cultivate More Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – This is an unfortunate truth in the nonprofit sector: philanthropy often presents an inherent bias toward a nonprofit’s pedigree of leadership over an authentic representation of the community it serves. And due to the unique nature of the nonprofit structure, the sector tends to organically organize itself around philanthropic demand.

This means that the most successful nonprofits are typically the ones most aligned with this bias – organizations headed by well-connected, well-resourced and credentialed leaders. But in recent years, there has been increasing emphasis on the importance of cultivating diversity, equity and inclusion in the nonprofit sector both from nonprofits themselves and from funders. While this topic was a huge theme of Kathleen’s keynote address, I was disappointed to see that it does not play a central role in her recommendations related to cultivating collective leadership in Social Startup Success.

Donors Must Invest in Nonprofits – Nonprofit leaders have long championed efforts to reframe the way donors understand “overhead” and instead highlight capacity building – not program funding – as the key to unlocking more sustainable nonprofit business models. Frequently, donors will pair an investment with specific, restrictive expectations about its usage and impact. Kathleen calls this “donor entitlement,” and if you’ve spent any time working for a nonprofit, I bet you’ve run into it.

While the tides of donor attitude toward capacity building are slowly changing, many nonprofits develop alternative fundraising strategies to cover operating costs. As Josh explored in a recent article for his Breaking Good column in the Biscuit, Forget “Charity.” Think Like a Business, earned income is an underutilized method of revenue generation for many nonprofits. Kathleen leans into this notion, dedicating two chapters within the theme of funding experimentation to an exploration of how to build successful earned income strategies.

In sum, Social Startup Success was full of well-researched strategies for organizational strengthening, and was a great kick-off for my new monthly series on the Next Stage blog: #NonprofitBookClub. What should I read next?

P.S. I have to give a shout out to our friends at SHARE Charlotte for all that they do to champion local nonprofits – their leadership has done so much to strengthen our community’s supportive infrastructure through the encouragement of philanthropic giving, volunteer engagement and other forms of charitable involvement. Facilitating conversations about topics like the ones presented in Social Startup Success will make all of our work more effective. If your nonprofit has not yet joined their online platform, I encourage you to check it out.

Our Firm’s Next Stage

by Josh Jacobson

We are proud to announce that our firm is rebranding… err, sort of…

Going forward, we will be known simply as Next Stage, dropping the word Consulting. Our new(ish) logo is above.

In truth, I never thought I would become a consultant. When I moved to Charlotte from New York City a decade ago, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do when I grew up. I felt I had climbed the mountain of fundraising for the performing arts and was prepared to run an organization. And I was pretty sure it wouldn’t be a cultural nonprofit. I had (and have) so many passions.

In 2008, Charlotte was a very different place than it is now. This was Charlotte just before the onset of the Great Recession and being a new guy from out of town rendered me persona non grata. “But who do you know locally?” I knew very few people. What I did know was process and strategy – I had learned best practices from some of the strongest nonprofit executives I will ever meet. But without a local network, I was going to have a tough road ahead. Indeed, people who turned me down for positions then are now friends and colleagues.

I share this because working as a consultant was not in my mind when I arrived in Charlotte. Without other options, and honestly without a clear direction of what I wanted to be in the nonprofit sector anyway, I reluctantly took up the title. And during my 10,000 hours learning the profession, a seed was planted that germinated as Next Stage.

It took a while – in fact, it took years – but nonprofits in Charlotte finally did wake up to the need for stronger leadership and resource development regardless of local footprint. Now, a talented professional from out of town is a coveted executive in our nonprofit sector. I was asked recently to assist with a nonprofit search where the preference was for someone not from Charlotte. Let that sink in for a minute.

My firm started in January 2014 with the charge to change what consulting could be. We sought to partner deeply with the nonprofits we serve, doing the homework needed to earn the right to offer assistance. We recalibrated the high cost of local consulting purposefully, to make strategy help affordable for many more types of organizations. And we sought out innovators and big thinkers – people who would be willing to invest in the partnership as deeply as we do.

The result? Another 10,000 hours and more than 100 nonprofit engagements later, Next Stage is reborn. While we have always seen ourselves as a social entrepreneurship company serving as a tool of community leaders on both sides of the philanthropic divide, we now understand the true nature of work. We see real gaps in our community – gaps that we feel called to help fill. Following last year’s addition of Caylin Haldeman as Next Stage’s Project Development Manager, we are expanding our model to serve Charlotte’s nonprofit and philanthropic communities by building out capacities that allow us to explore local challenges to our sector.

We feel we have already redefined what consulting can be, but it is a word that will always conjure different things for different people. We remain deeply committed to consulting with nonprofits – what we now call client partnerships – but we see a new horizon for our work.

Going forward, we are committing to three distinct lines of business:

  • Client Partnerships – We are extraordinarily proud of our 100+ engagements with nonprofits across the Carolinas, with a concentration in our hometown of Charlotte, NC. We believe that area nonprofits benefit from our efforts to dive deeply into organizational strengthening and resource development. As we look to the future, our goal is to serve as Charlotte’s go-to firm for vision-centric planning and implementation, and we welcome your help connecting with organizations seeking stellar counsel.
  • CULTIVATE – Our incubator for emerging nonprofits launched as a pilot in 2018 with participants including Charlotte is Creative, Promising Pages and Learning Help Centers of Charlotte. Early returns have been extremely positive, with each of these organizations taking substantial steps toward deepening impact and increasing sustainability. Next Stage is planning to expand the program in 2019. The application will be available beginning in early September 2018, so please help us source amazing founder-led organizations.
  • Thought Leadership – In early 2019, Next Stage will be publishing a research-informed report examining the challenges and opportunities of talent recruitment and retention in Charlotte’s nonprofit sector. Helping improve the ability of local nonprofits to source and keep talent is emerging as a leading issue facing our community, and Next Stage sees a need for leadership on this topic. This research begins in summer 2018, and we hope you will help us by responding to our requests for survey participation and interviews.

It’s a new day at Next Stage. We look forward to serving you – all of you.